Who Is This Antisocial Personality Disorder Quiz For?

Below is a list of questions that relate to life experiences common among people diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder—a mental health condition characterized by a persistent disregard for the feelings of others and a lack of empathy. Please read each question carefully and indicate whether you have experienced these thoughts or behaviors since the age of 15.

How Accurate Is It?

The quiz questions were derived using the DSM-5 Criteria for the Personality Disorders, established by the American Psychiatric Association (2013). This quiz and the results are NOT diagnostic tools or a substitute for a formal diagnosis. Only a licensed mental health professional or doctor can provide a formal diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder.

Psycom believes assessments can be a valuable first step toward getting treatment. All too often people stop short of seeking help out of fear their concerns aren’t legitimate or severe enough to warrant professional intervention.

Your privacy is important to us. All results are completely anonymous.

Do you repeatedly lie to or trick others for your own gain or pleasure?
Do you act impulsively?
Do you fail to plan ahead?
Do you consistently fail to fulfill work obligations?
Do you consistently fail to fulfill financial obligations?
Have you ever engaged in criminal behavior?
Do you find yourself unable to empathize with others dealing with difficult situations?
If you hurt someone else’s feelings, do you lack remorse or guilt?
Are you aggressive?
Do you engage in unnecessary risk-taking or dangerous behavior with no regard for the safety of self or others?
Do you consider yourself superior to others?
Do you use charm or wit to manipulate others for your own benefit?
Please enter the text above to prove you are human.

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Antisocial Personality Disorder FAQs

How common is antisocial personality disorder?

About 1% of females and 3% of males have antisocial personality disorder (so the prevalence in men is about triple that in women). The disorder is characterized by a history of conduct problems as a child, a lack of moral or ethical development, an inability to follow approved models of behavior, deceitfulness, and the shameless manipulation of others.1

At what age can antisocial personality disorder be diagnosed?

Usually, antisocial personality disorder is diagnosed anywhere from age 16 to 18 or older, says Naftali Berrill, PhD, director of the New York Center for Neuropsychology and Forensic Behavioral Science in Glen Head, New York. Often, he says, a person with antisocial personality disorder will have oppositional defiance disorder (ODD) in childhood, followed by conduct disorder during the teen years.

“People who are diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder almost always had these two conditions [ODD and conduct disorder] when they were younger,” agrees Steven Hollon, PhD, the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. “I don’t like diagnosing a personality disorder until someone is through adolescence, but people who had a problem with delinquency as teenagers or were in a lot of trouble as kids are at a higher risk for antisocial personality disorder.”

The criteria for being diagnosed with an antisocial personality disorder are in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5).

What do you call a person diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder?

Years ago, people with antisocial personality disorder were called psychopaths or sociopaths, says Steven Hollon, PhD, the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. These days, those names are no longer used by health professionals to describe people with antisocial personality disorder.

While people with antisocial personality disorder do not always get into legal trouble, they do tend to be cold and manipulative. Individuals diagnosed with the disorder often end up with criminal records. This is because they often violate the law and behave violently or impulsively. They often have problems with alcohol or drug use as well.2

What is the diagnostic precursor to antisocial personality disorder?

The precursor to antisocial personality disorder can be having oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as a child, says Naftali Berrill, PhD, director of the New York Center for Neuropsychology and Forensic Behavioral Science in Glen Head, New York. “It’s much more than just mischief,” he says. “The person might break a neighbor’s car window because the neighbor scolded them the day before. They may have a penchant for cruelty.”

What's the best way to deal with people diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder?

It really depends on how severe the case is, says Naftali Berrill, PhD, director of the New York Center for Neuropsychology and Forensic Behavioral Science in Glen Head, New York. “The literature has both benign and malignant types of antisocial personality disorder,” he says. “In benign cases, the person might just be a slick liar. You can call them out if you feel they are lying or manipulating. The malignant ones are the ones that get involved in serious crimes. It can be quite scary.”

Is antisocial personality disorder treatable?

It is very difficult to treat, says Steven Hollon, PhD, the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. “If the person goes for treatment, they act in a way that can make you think they are responding to treatment,” he says. “They always think of themselves as smarter than everyone around them. They see the therapist as not being as smart as they are.”

A person with antisocial personality disorder typically does a very good job of acting like they are getting better, Hollon explains. “But then they turn around and do something awful as soon as they think they can get away with it,” he says.

Another reason it can be difficult to treat this disorder is because the person often doesn’t see that they have a problem, explains Rudy Nydegger, PhD, professor emeritus of psychology and management at Union College and chief of the Division of Psychology at Ellis Hospital, both in Schenectady, New York. “They think the problem is with the people around them,” he says. “If the person wants help, it is treatable.” Very few people with this personality disorder respond to medication, he says.

Can antisocial personality disorder be prevented?

Dealing with conduct disorder (also known as oppositional defiant disorder or ODD) when the person is a child and teenager is important, says Steven Hollon, PhD, the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. “What works here is ‘response cost,’ which means the person loses privileges or something they like very much when they are engaging in oppositional behavior,” he explains. “This works much better than punishment."

In addition, Hollon says, it is very important to identify early on children who have ODD and offer training to their parents.

What is the difference between avoidant personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder?

Antisocial personality disorder is more serious than avoidant personality disorder, says Naftali Berrill, PhD, director of the New York Center for Neuropsychology and Forensic Behavioral Science in Glen Head, New York. Individuals with antisocial personality disorder break rules, lack empathy, tend to show no remorse, and may even appear to enjoy manipulating other people. In contrast, people with avoidant personality disorder don’t typically break rules and tend to be shy and inhibited.

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Last Updated: Aug 4, 2021