Who Is This Quiz For?

Below is a list of questions designed for people who are experiencing anxiety-inducing thoughts. The questions relate to life experiences common among people who have been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

Please read each question carefully, and indicate how often you have experienced the same or similar challenges in the past few months.

How Accurate Is It?

This quiz is NOT a diagnostic tool. Mental health disorders can only be diagnosed by licensed healthcare professionals. If you’d like to learn more about anxiety Psycom’s guide Tell Me All I Need to Know about Anxiety.

Psycom believes assessments can be a valuable first step toward getting treatment. All too often people stop short of seeking help out of fear their concerns aren’t legitimate or severe enough to warrant professional intervention.

How Is Anxiety Treated?

Anxiety is highly treatable often through a combination of cognitive behavior therapy and, in some cases, medication. To learn more, read our GAD Overview article.

Your privacy is important to us. All results are completely anonymous.

Do you worry about lots of different things?
Do you have trouble controlling your worries?
Do you get irritable and/or easily annoyed when anxious?
Does worry or anxiety make you feel fatigued or worn out?
Does worry or anxiety interfere with falling and/or staying asleep?
Does worry or anxiety make it hard to concentrate?
Do you feel jumpy?
Do you worry about how well you do things?
Do you worry about things working out in the future?
Do you worry about things that have already happened in the past?
Do your muscles get tense when you are worried or anxious?
Do you experience repetitive and persistent thoughts that are upsetting and unwanted?
Do you experience strong fear that causes panic, shortness of breath, chest pains, a pounding heart, sweating, shaking, nausea, dizziness and/or fear of dying?
Do you ever avoid places or social situation for fear of this panic?
Do you ever engage in repetitive behaviors to manage your worry? (For example, checking that the oven is off, locking doors, washing hands, counting, repeating words.)

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Anxiety Disorder FAQs

What is an anxiety disorder?

We all feel anxious from time to time, but anxiety disorders are more than a temporary bout of worry or fear. An anxiety disorder is characterized by persistent, overwhelming feelings of anxiety, worry, or fear that are intense enough to interfere with an individual’s day-to-day life. People with an anxiety disorder experience stress that is out of proportion to the thing they are worrying about and are unable to put these negative thoughts aside. They may feel constantly tense and on-edge, even if they aren’t certain what exactly they are anxious about.

What are the different types of anxiety?

There are several types of anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, separation anxiety disorder, and specific phobias. Examples of common specific phobias include pteromerhanophobia (fear of flying), claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) and arachnophobia (fear of spiders).

How do I know if I have anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal reaction to many things in life that may cause us to feel threatened, challenged or under pressure. Feeling anxious from time to time is no great cause for concern. However, if you experience persistent anxiety that feels overwhelming, unforgettable and interferes with your daily life, you may be dealing with the symptoms of an anxiety disorder. Always reach out to a mental health professional for expert advice on whether your symptoms meet the criteria for a diagnosis.

Why do I have anxiety?

What causes anxiety and anxiety disorders is complex. It is likely that a combination of both genetics and environmental factors play a role in why some individuals are more prone to anxiety than others. Some events, emotions, or experiences may make it more likely for the symptoms of anxiety to begin or worsen—these are known as triggers. Anxiety triggers can cause panic attacks in some people and differ from person to person and so working with a mental health professional to identify what your triggers are and how you can react when faced with them can be incredibly helpful.

How do I deal with anxiety?

There are many ways to deal with anxiety and combining a variety of approaches may help. For those with a diagnosed anxiety disorder, a combination of psychotherapy alongside a medication plan can be very effective. For those who experience anxiety from time to time, there are a variety of relaxation techniques to try that may qualm feelings of worry or fear: breathing techniques, meditation, and progressive muscle relaxation are just some examples of techniques to try. Finding a distraction, taking part in physical activity, and talking to someone you trust are also all great options for relieving everyday anxiety.

How is anxiety treated?

Treatment for anxiety typically consists of a combination of psychotherapy (talk therapy) and medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most effective form of psychotherapy for generalized anxiety disorder. CBT teaches specific skills to manage your worries and help you gradually return to the activities you have avoided because of anxiety.

What medications are used in the treatment of anxiety?

Several types of medications are used in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, including antidepressants (including SSRIs and SRNIs), buspirone and benzodiazepines. Always talk with your doctor or mental health professional about the benefits, risks and possible side effects of medication for anxiety.

How can I use CBD oil for anxiety?

Early research is promising regarding the ability of CBD oil to help relieve anxiety. Although more research is needed, specifically on humans and generalized anxiety disorder to confirm if CBD can reduce the symptoms of anxiety, you may be interested in talking to your doctor to figure out a starting dosage that is right for you. While CBD is generally considered safe, some people who take CBD may experience some side effects such as diarrhea, fatigue, and changes in appetite. CBD may also interfere with certain medications or dietary supplements. One case study on a child under 18 offered evidence that CBD is effective as a safe alternative treatment to traditional psychiatric medications for reducing anxiety and insomnia.

What is social anxiety?

Social anxiety disorder is a chronic mental health condition in which social interactions cause irrational anxiety. Social anxiety is more than just feeling shy. People with social anxiety have an intense fear of situations where they could be watched, judged, embarrassed, or rejected by others. The symptoms are so extreme that they interfere with the person’s daily routine and prevent them from taking part in ordinary activities.

How can I help someone with anxiety?

Knowing the symptoms of anxiety can help you realize and act when someone you care about is in distress. Common anxiety behaviors include avoidance of feared situations or events (for example, children with school refusal), seeking reassurance, second-guessing, and irritability. The person may be engaging in all-or-nothing thinking or catastrophizing and demonstrating their belief that the worst will happen. If you notice these symptoms, avoid telling the anxious person not to worry or downplaying their feelings, which may leave them feeling misunderstood and belittled. Instead, be an active listener, express your concern, and recognize how difficult this is for them. Kindly encourage them to talk to a mental health professional or to draw on the techniques they have learned in therapy, if they are already in treatment.

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Last Updated: Jul 19, 2021