Who Is This Quiz For?

Answer the quiz questions below to see if your child could have autism.

Below is a list of questions that relate to life experiences common among children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Please read each question carefully, and indicate how often your child has experienced the same or similar challenges in the past few months.

Please be aware that some behaviors are developmentally appropriate for your young child and are not signs of autism.

How Accurate Is It?

This quiz is NOT a diagnostic tool. Mental health disorders can only be diagnosed by licensed healthcare professionals. If you’d like to learn more about autism read Psycom’s guide to autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Psycom believes assessments can be a valuable first step toward getting treatment. All too often people stop short of seeking help out of fear their concerns aren’t legitimate or severe enough to warrant professional intervention.

How Is ASD Treated?

One of the biggest challenges is finding the most effective form of treatment. The choices seem endless and differentiating one from another can be daunting. Parents often rely on therapists to direct and administer treatment, but many parents want to learn as much as possible so they’re in the best position to help their child. The most common treatments include applied behavioral analysis, relationship-building strategies, speech/language, and occupational therapy, counseling, and social skills groups.

To learn more, read our ASD Overview  article.

Your privacy is important to us. All results are completely anonymous.

Does your child have limited speech (non-verbal or speaks in only short phrases)?
Does your child tend to give random answers to questions, or make random comments?
Does your child not respond to their name?
Does your child avoid eye contact?
Does your child not engage in pretend play with other children?
Does your child struggle to understand other people's feelings?
Is your child easily upset by small changes?
Does your child have obsessive interests?
Does your child engage in repetitive behaviors such as pacing or lining up of objects?
Is your child over or under-sensitive to smells, tastes, or touch?
Does your child struggle to socialize with other children?
Does your child avoid physical contact?
Does your child show little awareness of dangerous situations?

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Child Autism FAQs

How to test a child for autism

You may ask your child’s healthcare provider to periodically check your child for signs of autism with a developmental screening test. A screening test alone will not result in a diagnosis but can indicate if your child should see a specialist. A developmental pediatrician, child psychologist or psychiatrist, pediatric neurologist, speech-language pathologist, occupational therapist, or other specialist can conduct a formal developmental evaluation.

Where to test your child for autism?

If you suspect your child may have autism spectrum disorder, start by raising your concerns with your child’s pediatrician. If your doctor determines that your child may be showing symptoms of autism, they will refer you to a specialist who treats children with autism spectrum disorder, such as a child psychiatrist or psychologist, pediatric neurologist, or developmental pediatrician, for an evaluation.

When to test a child for autism?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)recommends that all children be screened for autism spectrum disorder during their regular wellness visits at 18 and 24 months. A diagnosis by a specialist can be considered very reliable once the child is 2 years of age.

How early can I test my child for autism?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends developmental and behavioral screening for all children during regular well-child visits at 9, 18, and 24 months. Screening specifically for autism begins at the 18-month visit. A diagnosis by a specialist can be considered very reliable once the child is 2 years of age.

How do you talk with your child about their autism diagnosis?

It can be hard to decide what and how much information to share when talking to your child about their autism diagnosis. Setting a positive tone when discussing autism spectrum disorder and making sure you understand what your child is truly asking is very important. Establish a positive attitude about their differences from the outset, then answer their questions simply and honestly. If your child is of reading age, you may want to consider finding some children’s books on the topic of autism spectrum disorder to read with them.

What does an autism diagnosis mean for my child?

An autism diagnosis can result in some beneficial effects, but also comes with associated risks, disadvantages, and contraindications. Once your child is diagnosed with autism, you can expect your doctor to devise a specific treatment plan, comprised of therapy and/or medication to help your child function more easily in daily life. You can also seek specific guidance and support for your child to thrive at school. Despite these benefits, a diagnosis of autism also come with the risk of social stigmatization for the child. There is also a range of physical and mental-health conditions that frequently accompany autism including but not limited to: gastrointestinal problems, epilepsy, ADHD, anxiety, and depression.

How to help your child after an autism diagnosis?

There are many things you can do to help a child with autism spectrum disorder. Start by ensuring their treatment plan is tailored according to their individual needs and work closely with the therapists, teachers and doctors involved to make sure you are following through with the therapy at home and school. It is also important to provide children with autism with a sense of structure in their lives. Create a detailed routine for your child and stick with it. You can also create consistency at home by reinforcing things the child may have learned in other settings and using positive reinforcement to reward good behavior.

Can a child be slightly autistic?

A child can be mildly autistic. Every child with autism spectrum disorder is unique and so symptoms may differ in severity and range between individuals. Children diagnosed as mildly autistic are unable to understand the body language or emotions of the people around them, but they do have normal intelligence and can conduct their daily activities.

What can mimic autism?

Developmental delays (when a child is unable to do something by a certain age) such as language, speech, or hearing problems can often be mistaken for autism. There are also a number of specific disorders that are characterized by similar behavioral symptoms to autism. According to the Autism Research Institute, Williams Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Landau-Kleffner Syndrome, are all closely related to autism.

What age does autism usually show up?

The behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorder often appear early in the child’s development. Many children show symptoms of autism between 12 and 18 months of age or earlier, but in others autism may not become obvious until the age of 2 or 3 years. The age of diagnosis, as well as the range and severity of symptoms, can vary widely and so professional evaluation is critical.

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Last Updated: Jul 12, 2021