Who Is This Quiz For?

The questions below relate to life experiences that are common among people who have bipolar disorder. Please read each question carefully, and indicate how often you have experienced the same or similar challenges in the past few weeks.

How Accurate Is It?

This quiz is NOT a diagnostic tool. Mental health disorders can only be diagnosed by a licensed mental health professional or doctor.

Psycom believes assessments can be a valuable first step toward getting treatment. All too often people stop short of seeking help out of fear their concerns aren’t legitimate or severe enough to warrant professional intervention.

Your privacy is important to us. All results are completely anonymous.

At times I am MUCH more talkative or speak MUCH faster than usual.
There have been times when I was MUCH more active or did MANY more things than usual.
I get into moods where I feel VERY speeded up or irritable.
There have been times when I have felt both high (elated) and low (depressed) AT THE SAME TIME.
At times I have been MUCH more interested in sex than usual.
My self-confidence ranges from GREAT self-doubt to EQUALLY GREAT overconfidence.
There have been GREAT variations in the quantity or quality of my work.
FOR NO OBVIOUS REASON I sometimes have been VERY angry or hostile.
Sometimes I am mentally dull and at other times I think VERY creatively.
At times I am GREATLY interested in being with people and at other times I just want to be left alone with my thoughts.
At some times I have GREAT optimism and at other times EQUALLY GREAT pessimism.
Some of the time I show MUCH tearfulness and crying and at other times I laugh and joke EXCESSIVELY.

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This test is based on the bipolar screening questionnaire created by Dr. Ivan Goldberg. If you think you may be suffering from Bipolar Disorder or any other mental health condition, PsyCom strongly recommends that you seek help from a doctor in order to receive a proper diagnosis and support.

Bipolar Disorder FAQs

How is bipolar disorder diagnosed?

Bipolar disorder is diagnosed through a clinical interview with a licensed mental health professional, explains Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.

“Sometimes, the mental health professional will also ask the person to complete some assessment measures to aid in the diagnosis,” Rego says. “They may also ask to speak with a family member or partner, or other significant person in the person’s life, in order to get additional information about the impact the disorder has had on the person and their relationships.”

Who can diagnose bipolar?

Bipolar disorder is most often diagnosed by a mental health professional, such as a psychologist, psychiatrist, or social worker.

When is bipolar diagnosed?

Bipolar disorder is typically diagnosed during the late teen years or early adulthood, says Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Occasionally, bipolar symptoms can appear in children.

To be diagnosed with bipolar disorder, the person must have experienced at least one depressive episode and one manic or hypomanic episode.

How long does it take to diagnose bipolar disorder?

Diagnosing the disorder can be done in one or two assessment sessions, says Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. However, because bipolar disorder can be confused with other disorders such as depression and borderline personality disorder, getting the correct diagnosis can take some time.

For example, some research suggests that it takes an average of three and a half years to confirm a diagnosis of bipolar disorder after the first major mood episode, with other research suggesting it can take even longer, Rego says.

Can people tell they are bipolar?

People can often tell that something is wrong (often with their mood), but may not always be able to accurately label it as bipolar. For example, it is frequently easy for people to know when they are depressed, but sometimes symptoms of mania go unnoticed, or feel “good,” so they are not as easily seen as an issue, says Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.

Can bipolar disorder go away?

Bipolar disorder tends to be seen as an ongoing condition that waxes and wanes throughout one’s life, says Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.

“Fortunately, the symptoms can often be controlled and stabilized in most cases when proper treatment (ideally, the combination of medication and psychotherapy) is in place,” Rego says.

Can bipolar disorder get worse with age?

Bipolar disorder may get worse with age—but this is generally the case over time if it is left untreated, explains Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. If treated with a combination of medication and therapy, people have a much better chance of managing their bipolar disorder, Rego says. “Even then, it’s important for people to monitor their symptoms and seek help right away if they start to feel a change in their mood,” he says.

Can anxiety turn into bipolar?

There is no research evidence that suggests that anxiety can turn into bipolar disorder, says Simon A. Rego, PsyD, Chief Psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. People with bipolar disorder may experience feelings of anxiety, however, and may also confuse some of the symptoms of bipolar disorder for symptoms of anxiety.

In addition, some of the symptoms of bipolar disorder can also be associated with some of the anxiety disorders, Rego says. And some people may have both an anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder.

“So it's not always so easy to sort these things out,” Rego says. “It is much more important to seek professional help if you’re experiencing symptoms that are causing you distress or interference in your ability to function in life.”

Last Updated: Jul 8, 2021