Is someone you know having episodes of uncontrollable laughing and/or crying? They could have Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA).

Below is a list of questions that relate to life experiences common among people diagnosed with PBA. Please read each question carefully and indicate whether you have noticed the person you are concerned about experiencing these behaviors.

Your privacy is important to us. All results are completely anonymous.

Does the person you are concerned about find it difficult to control or stop the onset of giggling or laughter in situations that are not funny?
Even when not feeling sad, does the person you are concerned about experience tearfulness or outbursts of crying that may seem to come out of nowhere?
Does the person you are concerned about experience swift emotional changes that do not reflect their feelings, such as suddenly crying followed by laughing?
Are these episodes causing the individual significant distress or impairing their ability to function at work or social events?
How often does the person you are concerned about experience involuntary tearfulness, crying, giggling and/or laughing when those responses do not match their true feelings?
Is it difficult for the person you are concerned about to control the extent and duration of these episodes?
Some people, who have been diagnosed with another condition, exhibit symptoms of the emotional disorder pseudobulbar affect (PBA). Has the person you are concerned about been diagnosed with any of the following conditions? Stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease, or Parkinson’s disease.

To the best of your knowledge, is there a possibility your loved one is using drugs or taking any medications that could be causing these episodes?

Please enter the text above to prove you are human.

Enter your email below to receive the free Psycom mental health eNewsletter. (We try hard to make it great and we will not bombard your inbox)

Email
Last Updated: Sep 17, 2018